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Microsoft word - hum 2102 syllabus

Introduction to the Foremost Traditions in the Study of Society

Course Description:
This course approaches social theory from a critical perspective. Classical sociologists, such as
Marx, Weber and Durkheim, will be reviewed; however, the focus of the course will be
understanding theory in light of the changes that society has undergone since the foundation of
modern sociology in the 19th century. Conceptual topics include the roots of social inequalities,
problems of modernity, gender roles, power, and an examination of democracy. Students are
encouraged to use these concepts to improve their own research and better understand the society
(or societies) in which they live.
Course Materials:
Required Reading
:
Students are required to purchase a coursepack from Allegra on 1069 Bank Street (613-730-3000).
Recommended Supplementary Readings:
Nicolas Abercrombie (2001). The Penguin Dictionary of Sociology. Prentice Hall.

Course Requirements
Attendance


Attendance

Students are to sign an attendance sheet provided by the instructor after the short mid-class break. This applies for classes 2 through 11.
Mid-term Exam (30%):
The mid-term exam will consist of 30 multiple choice questions worth 1 point each on the content
of classes 1 through 5. The exam will take place during the first 45 minutes of class 7 (November
1
).
Essay (30%):
Students will select a concept presented in the course readings that interests them and write an
explanatory essay on that concept. Essay length should be between 1,000 and 1,500 words. Cite
at least three (3) academic sources relevant to your chosen concept. Students may use any
citation style but the style must be consistent throughout the essay. Essays are due at the
beginning of Class 12 (December 6), and will be graded and returned to the students at the end of
the final exam.
Final Exam (30%):
This will be given during the university’s formal exam period, and will test students’
understanding of the material covered by the entire course. It will consist of 15 short answer
questions and 30 multiple choice questions. The exam duration will be three hours.

Other Guidelines
Essay Submission:
Only a hard copy of essays will be accepted by the instructor. Electronic
copies of your essay will not be accepted via e-mail or any other medium. Late essay submissions
will be downgraded one letter-grade category per day. For example a B+ paper, one day late, will
receive a B.

Plagiarism and Cheating:
It is not acceptable to hand in the same assignment for two or more
courses. It is an instructional offence to use or pass off as one’s own idea or product which is the
work of another without expressly giving credit to that other person. Copying another student’s
work is also an instructional offence. Incidents of plagiarism and cheating will be referred to the
Dean’s Office for appropriate action.
To obtain credit for this course, students must complete all of the course requirements. Failure to
complete all of the requirements will result in a failing grade in this course.
Course Schedule – Subject to Revision

Class 1: Introduction
(Introduction of course requirements, basic themes and key issues) Class 2: The Origins of Sociology
“Responding to Chaos: A Brief History of Sociology” in McIntyre, Lisa J. (2006). The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology, 3rd edition. New York: McGraw-Hill. (pp. 5-25) Class 3: Another Perspective on the Origins
“Chapter 2 Improving Human Societies: Reassessing the Classical Theorists” in Feagin, Joe R. and Hernan Vera (2008). Liberation Sociology, 2nd Edition. Boulder: Paradigm Publishers (pp. 37-57; notes on 271) Marcuse, Herbert. “Chapter 12: The New Forms of Control” in Hier, Sean P. ed. (2005) Contemporary Sociological Thought: Themes and Theories. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press. (pp. 153-162) Class 4: Changes to Global Society
“Chapter 1: 1968—2009: What Happened?” in Hancock, Black Hawk and Roberta Garner (2009). Changing Theories: New Directions in Sociology. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. (pp. 19-49) Class 5: Adjusting Theory
“Chapter 2: Changes in Theory” in Hancock, Black Hawk and Roberta Garner (2009). Changing Theories: New Directions in Sociology. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. (pp. 51-96) Class 6: Modernity
Habermas, Jurgen. “Modernity—An Incomplete Project” in Hier, Sean P. ed. (2005) Contemporary Sociological Thought: Themes and Theories. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press. (pp. 163-174) Beck, Ulrich. “Introduction: The Cosmopolitan Manifesto” in Hier, Sean P. ed. (2005) Contemporary Sociological Thought: Themes and Theories. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press. (pp. 357-365) Class 7: Social Inequality
**in-class mid-term exam**
“Chapter 11: Explaining Social Inequality” in Knuttila, Murray (2008). Introducing Sociology: A Critical
Approach, Fourth Edition.
Don Mills: Oxford University Press Canada. (pp. 239-273)
White, Jerry and Dan Beavon. “Chapter 38: Aboriginal Well-Being: Canada’s Continuing Challenge” in
Carroll, Michael and Jerry P. White (2010). Image of Society: Readings that Inspire and Inform Sociology.
Toronto: Nelson Education. (pp. 221-231)
Class 8: Feminism
“Chapter 9: Feminist Theory: Addressing Sociology’s Lacuna” in Knuttila, Murray (2008). Introducing Sociology: A Critical Approach, Fourth Edition. Don Mills: Oxford University Press Canada. (pp. 197-219) Hooks, Bell “Chapter 18: The Significance of Feminism” in Hier, Sean P. ed. (2005) Contemporary Sociological Thought: Themes and Theories. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press. (pp. 233-242) Class 9: Power and Anarchy I
Day, Richard J. F. (2005). Gramsci is Dead: Anarchist Currents in the Newest Social Movements. London: Pluto Press. (pp. 91-128) Class 10: Power and Anarchy II
Gordon, Uri (2008). Anarchy Alive! Anti-Authoritarian Politics from Practice to Theory. London: Pluto Press. (pp. 47-77) Class 11: Activism and Change
Day, Richard J. F. (2005). Gramsci is Dead: Anarchist Currents in the Newest Social Movements. Class 12: Democracy and the Crisis of the State (Dec 6)
Graeber, David (2007). “There Never Was a West: Or, Democracy Emerges From the Spaces in
Between” in Ibid. Possibilities: Essays on Hierarchy, Rebellion and Desire. Oakland: AK Press.
(pp. 329-374)
**Essays due**

Source: http://ustpaul.ca/upload-files/HumanSciences/cours2011-2012/HUM_2102_syllabus.pdf

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